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Tales From The Dry Side Publishing Process Has Begun!



All kinds of exciting things are happening around here. I started the publishing process for Tales From the Dry Side with Outskirts Press this week and we are full steam ahead. I have been working with my author representative, Terri, and she anticipates the book will be published in seven-ten weeks. This week I submitted the manuscript, cover photo, author photo, and wrote the back cover text. The process has been going well and Terri has spent a lot of time with me so far on the phone and via e-mail educating me on the specifics of self-publishing. I enjoy the flexibility that this publishing company is giving me in regards to every detail of the book, including the entire interior design, right down to the font type and size. Over the next few days I will be working on choosing the specifics of the interior book design.



The manuscript was read this past week by a manuscript review team. They checked the content for numerous things such as any potential legal issues and they approved the manuscript for publication. I also had a discussion with Terri about obtaining contributor release forms which is quite a task as there are twelve other writing contributors and one photographer contributor. Anyways, the manuscript review team sent me an e-mail complimenting me on the manuscript. I realized that this was only the second time that someone besides myself had read the manuscript. The first person was the CEO of the Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation. The feedback they sent me was as follows:



"This is an amazing collection of stories. I have to be honest. Before reading your book I had not heard of Sjögren's Syndrome. I love these stories of perseverance and determination to live a life that is as normal as humanly possible. So many healthy people live life without stopping to smell the roses. I love the zest for life each person shares with the reader. It is obvious that you have done your homework with this book. It is well planned and carefully written. The manner in which each person shares and writes is wonderful. Each story has a narrative voice that is friendly and familiar and warm. You never talk at your reader but share life experiences leaving the reader with a better understanding for the adversity that some people face. I love reading other peoples stories. You remind your readers to become reconnected with themselves. I loved that in many of the stories the illness made them get off the merry-go-round of life and to live a life that is more fulfilling for them. Sometimes you have to face something difficult to see how beautiful something truly is. I read a quote somewhere that simply stated that all we have is now. You and your contributors write with a genuineness that is hard to find in the written word. With all of that being said, I must say that you have put together a fantastic resource here. You have really considered your audience in your writing by adding details and adding a voice that leaves you feeling like we just chatted over coffee. You do not preach but rather share. You have crafted an excellent piece here; one that should be well received by a wide audience. Bravo on a piece well crafted!"


I have to say, I was very relieved to read this!


So the hard work continues. Every day is a learning experience during this process. Thank you all again for your donations, support, and love. When I was speaking with my author representative this week, she was very impressed with the fact that I funded this book with a successful Kickstarter campaign as she knows many have tried to fund self-published books via this way and have not succeeded. That is because of all of you. God bless you.

Comments

  1. Congratulations! I have SS and I look forward to reading your book.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Congratulations on your book! I admire your strength and courage in stepping out of your comfort zone. Looking forward to hearing more about it!

    ReplyDelete

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