Saturday, July 26, 2014

Community Supported Agriculture


Today is Wednesday, my favorite weekday during the summer now. Why, you ask? Because it's the day I go to a local farm and pick up my crop share from a local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). I had toyed around with the idea last year of getting involved with a CSA, but was a bit uncertain about the whole thing. Then this past winter, a friend of mine asked if my husband and I would like to split a share as a whole share was too much food for her two-person family. With it just being my husband and I at home, I figured it would be a good way to try it out.



There are different options for how you want to pay and you can either pay the whole amount up front or pay in installments. The total price of our share, for the two of us, was $795. This included an additional fruit share which cost us over $100 for the season. This seems like a lot of money, but for two households, for twenty-four weeks, it is not. The breakdown for each of us is $16 per week. I will tell you right now with the amount of food we get, it is a bargain. The farm we chose is organic and organic produce is a lot costlier. Last week's share for me and my husband would have cost us around $35 in the supermarket, instead of $16. And that doesn't even include what we got from pick-your-own. I don't know what other farms do, but our farm has a sliding scale system for payment so there is some flexibility for those who have income issues.



So each every Wednesday, we go to the farm to get our produce. There is a list of what is available for that week and as you go around the farm stand, there are labels for how much you can take of each item. For example, last week, we were allowed two zucchinis, 1/3 pound of fresh basil, etc. This way, there is enough of each item for all CSA members. Heather and I usually split every item in half, but not always. Sometimes you only get one of something that cannot be split and in that case, we compensate by the other person taking something more of another item or taking one of a different item. Sometimes there is something that one of us doesn't like and then it does not go to waste because the other person will take it. Heather gets all the cilantro for example because I HATE cilantro and won't cook with it so my husband doesn't get it either!



Because the produce is picked right off the farm, it is super fresh. I have had heads of lettuce, properly stored, last me over two weeks. I didn't realize how much freshness is lost on produce when you are buying from a supermarket that is not purchasing local, or when it is sitting in the supermarket for days and days. You can also freeze a lot of your produce for use during the colder months.



Another perk of a CSA is that you get to pick-your-own with items in season. I never thought I would enjoy this as much as I have. I do have a tough time in the sun in the summer, even with sunblock, so I tend to go early in the morning. I check the map, see what is available, how much I can pick, and get to work. There is something very therapeutic for me about going into the fields and picking the food you are going to eat for dinner that night, or sometime during the next few weeks. I have picked my own strawberries, green/yellow beans, and sugar snap peas. Sure, it's more work because you pick them, bring them home to wash and store them versus just picking a package off the shelf, but the quality and taste is so worth the effort.



Probably one of my favorite features if the unlimited supply of pick-your-own herbs. This was a totally new venture for me. I had no idea what to do with herbs, what foods certain ones are good with, etc. However, I had been experimenting more with bottled herbs since I started eating Paleo/Whole 30 and I figured that fresh herbs would make our meals all that much better. So I did some research and started drying herbs. I have enjoyed seeing how the different herbs actually grow in the fields and on any given day, you will see rows of herbs drying from our kitchen baker's rack. I have dried basil, rosemary, dill, thyme, sage, oregano, chive, savory, and parsley. I'm sure I'm forgetting some! Again, this takes a bit of effort, more so than picking your own vegetables, but the dishes I have made with these herbs have been outstanding; no comparison!



There have been quite a few benefits for my husband and I with using a CSA, besides the money saving aspect. I have made a commitment to not waste any of the food that we get from the CSA. Mostly because any unused food from the farm goes to feed the staff and homeless people and I would feel terrible if I wasted something that someone else could have used. This means that oftentimes, I force myself to try a new food and I cook with more vegetables than I normally would have prior to this season. As my family well knows, I grew up hating most vegetables and it has been a huge process to get past that and actually TRY them all. I have come to find that there are very few I absolutely won't eat (i.e. tomatoes). For the most part, the ones I don't eat, I shouldn't anyways because they can be bad for people with autoimmune issues (tomatoes and eggplant). I think my body kind of knows it shouldn't eat them
.


Anyways, being involved with the CSA has gotten me to try new things, in order not to waste the produce and to try and get different nutrients into my system.  Before this summer, I rarely ate cabbage and never had zucchini, beets, garlic scapes (that is a MUST try!), etc. These are foods that are seriously healthy for you and help to prevent disease, including inflammation processes. Because we are eating more whole foods, the both of us are eating far fewer processed foods. It has only been about five weeks and I think that within time, my husband and I are both going to see a difference in how we feel and look. We are eating healthier meals, cooking more, eating out less, and I am enjoying the creativity that comes from creating new dishes.



If you are trying to eat healthier, I would encourage you to consider joining a CSA in the future. I am very happy that we decided to undergo this adventure and I honestly cannot ever envision a year where we will not do this. Thank you Red Fire Farm and Heather!



1 comment:

  1. LOVE summer time for that very reason!!! Farmer's markets!!! Wish we did not live in an area where there is 9 months of winter. There is just nothing as good as farm fresh fruits and vegetables. Not that we can get the good stuff all year - it just has to come from such a long ways away and costs so much.

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